FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions about the CPBA

What is the CPBA?
The Canadian Professional Bartenders Association is a group of Bartenders formed to exchange of news, techniques and ideas between members to encourage high standards and advancement of the profession of Bartending in Canada.
If you are a Bartender in Canada you are an eligible member.

When was the CPBA Founded?
The CPBA was formed in 2008 by a group of like-minded Canadian bartenders in Vancouver. In 2013 the CPBA expanded from BC to other provinces, including Quebec, Alberta, Ontario & the Maritimes and a National Board was established. Since then the BC Chapter has continued to operate, but the members of the National Board and other provincial chapters have dissolved. The BC Chapter has been operating with national interests in mind, but primarily has a focus on BC.

Who are the Executive Board Members?
Our current Executive Board for the BC Chapter (Elections at AGM held Feb 10, 2019)
President – Trevor Kallies
Vice President – Amber Bruce
Secretary – Robyn Gray
Membership – Kevin Brownlee
Treasurer – JS Dupuis
Corporate Liaison – Jon Smolensky
Communications (membership/Social Media) – Carolyn Yu
Events – Chris Chuy
Education – Cam Brown
Community Outreach – Vacant
Island Liaison – Jayce Kadyschuk
Okanagan Liaison – Max Borrowman

What does the CPBA do?
The CPBA has been involved and joined with a variety of like-minded organizations over the years. We have assisted in fundraising for BCHF, Science World among others raising hundreds of thousands of dollars to give back to various initiatives.

Partner with a variety of like-minded organizations that are dedicated to growing the bar professional community at large via:
-Fundraising efforts
-Event organization
-Community outreach
-Educational initiatives
-Professional development tools for bartenders

Partner with brands and their marketing agencies via:
-Facilitating product education sessions
-Providing on-the-ground logistical support for cocktail competitions and seminars
-Completing marketing objectives that help foster community growth and professional development for bartenders 
-Communicating their upcoming news and events to our members

Create value-add and exclusive opportunities for members, such as:
-Partnership education sessions that go beyond the hospitality industry (i.e. health, wellness and personal growth)
-Support of members’ initiatives through our media and social media platforms
-Unique LTO activations that are only available to members
-Optional group-plan for critical illness, disability, health and dental
-Canada’s primary source for industry news and information
-Leverage our membership strength to obtain group rates relevant to bar professionals in their local communities

How Much are Membership Fees?
Since our origin, our membership fees have been $75 for a 1 year membership and $150 for a 3 year membership.

Due to Covid-19 layoffs and closures we have waived the fees and are temporarily offering a 1 year membership at no cost to any new members signing up.

Why are CPBA membership fees being waived?
Given that so many bartenders have become unexpectedly unemployed or laid off we wanted to temporarily ensure that everyone had access to the benefits of our association without the burden of paying a membership fee. We all have enough bills and costs to worry about without an extra membership fee or subscription.

We don’t have a Chapter in our province, what would  a new provincial chapter potentially look like? What are the steps?
Schedule an open meeting in your region for all potential members (those already paid in good standing as well as potential members. Ensure that you give yourself some time for that meeting as it may be up to 1.5-2hrs. Ahead of that meeting, post for Provincial members the various positions of the CPBA executive board.
This meeting should function as an opportunity for paid members to elect the Executive Board of the new provincial chapter (all executive board members must be paid members before accepting the position). There are likely  a number of people who would like to get involved in some capacity or other, this gives the members an opportunity to nominate, then elect the board  themselves.
Elections are a very simple process: members can nominate themselves or others. Nominated members would have to accept the nomination. If there’s only one candidate nominated, and they accept, they can take the position un-opposed. Members can be nominated for more than one position, but they would have to accept one or the other if they win both, decided, then members would have to re-vote etc.

There are 10 positions available.